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Email Addressing: Avoid “To Whom it May Concern…”

Email Addressing Etiquette

I have a bunch of my owns sites. With that come email inquiries through each site’s contact form. Or directly after acquiring, or as I like to say, “farming” my address somewhere out-there.

Greetings = Impression

Being a seasoned online marketer, I know that having my websites clearly reflect the human behind the curtain makes my presentation more personal. This approach allows people to connect with me on a one-on-one level. So with very little effort, you know it’s me.

PRO-TIP
If you have a website, never make your primary email address visible. This only facilitates increased spam. Instead, create a specific email address, such as [email protected], [email protected], [email protected] Then, you can retire it if need be due to spam levels or misuse.

My sites are so me with a photo of yours truly on the About page. Which is just one little click away from any page in each site. If one were to look…

You would see that I am the one behind the site. Therefore, it is not a stretch to assume I would be the person that would respond to your email question or inquiry. So, what do you think is implied when I receive an email addressed to “To Whom it May Concern”?

If through my contact form, that reflects we are going from site to site, looking for the contact form, copy-n-pasting and then on to the next. This approach also tells me you do not respect my time.

Nor are you worth my consideration if you are trying to pitch me on something. You have made it clear that you are not motivated enough to take the time to submit a proper inquiry. So why should I take my time to respond?

Personalization is Personal

When you email any website, especially for an important issue, it behooves you to take your time to do it right. For example an employment inquiry. Make the effort to look for the person you need to contact by name.

“To Whom it May Concern” tells me you are not concerned about contacting the correct person. You just want the information you want or to get your request in front of anyone that you feel “may” be “concerned” enough to offer assistance.

That certainly does not leave a positive impression. And it reflects your unwillingness to make even a little extra effort.

Then add the “Dear Sir” emails and I can very quickly determine the serious inquiries from those who just want what they want from me (an answer, an opinion, advice, or for me to use their services).

So, don’t make that mistake by assuming. You know what happens when you assume?

If you cannot find a name to specifically address your inquiry to, a simple “Hello” will be much more welcoming than a To Whom It May Concern which reflects there is actually no concern other than yours.

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